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Step by Step Guide: Getting Started

Getting Started

 

For faculty, OER often begins with a need to fill content gaps, or to identify enhanced or replacement resources for a course. The following list of steps illustrates a typical OER development process to consider as a starting point.


Getting Started: Step by Step Guide

 

Step by Step 'Getting Started' Guide


STEP #1 - Find Resources
 
  • When starting your OER project, look for suitable resources that might meet your needs or which can contribute to any resource that you create. Search dedicated OER repositories. You can find a list of these on the Find OER guide.
     
  • Consider your own materials that may be available, including syllabi, lecture notes, handouts and other resources prepared previously.
     
  • As you begin gathering content, remember to monitor the copyright permissions that might be needed. If you've created content, you own the copyright. If the material you will be using ‚Äčis covered by a Creative Commons license, make sure the license covers your intended use. If the material is covered under traditional copyright, you will need to seek permission to use it in an openly licensed resource or find alternative content.  
     

STEP #2 - Begin Compiling Your Content

  • With your collection of resources at your disposal, start piecing them together to create a learning resource or set of resources to meet your instructional objectives and learning outcomes.

  • Identify an OER authoring tool to support your work. Several existing tools are available. Find a list in the TOOLS & RESOURCES guide. Consult with library staff and AIAs if you would like assistance selecting an appropriate tool to use.
     
  • Consider collaborating. With the shared aim of meeting student learning outcomes, faculty and library staff can work together on constructing searches and evaluating fit of OER.
     

STEP #3 - Adopt, Adapt or Create
 

  • You may decide to use the OER content that you compile “as is,” by printing/downloading them, or sharing the links with your students.
     
  • You may also decide to adapt or remix the content with additional content that you author. This will help you to create a resource that might better meet specific needs in your classroom. You might even revise and add additional content later based on feedback once implemented.
     

STEP #4 - Be Sure It's Accessible

  • Accessibility laws and Macalester campus policy frequire that your resource in an accessible format that meets the needs of your students.  There are some guidelines for what is accessible—other than it must meet the need of the student requesting the accessible format. However, as educators, we a have ethical obligations to ensure that courses are fully accessible to all learners, including those with disabilities.


STEP #5 - Use Your OER Resource

 

  • Select and Creative Commons under which you plan to publish and use your OER. By doing this, you OER resource opens up possibilities for new, more collaborative teaching and learning practices--because the materials can be used, adapted and shared within and across learning communities.
     
  • You may also decide to adapt or remix the content with additional content that you author. This will help you to create a resource that might better meet specific needs in your classroom. You might even revise and add additional content later based on feedback once implemented.

 

STEP #6 - Share Your OER Resource
 

  • Make sure your resource is fully open and adaptable.  Be sure to clearly label your resource with the Creative Commons license under which it was published. Make sure it's also adaptable by others. The more modular your content is, the easier it is for future users to reuse it. If you’re working on an open textbook, separate your content by chapter and subchapter. If possible, provide a version of your resource in an editable easily format.
     
  • Publish your OER resource to a repository where it can be found by your colleagues and the open education community.  Allowing others to use and build upon your work begins further enhances the open classroom resources that exist in the global commons.
     
  • Be sure to add a resource description, keywords and other metadata that will help others find your open resource. The library can help with this.

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Video Tutorials and Resources

Video which highlights the OER creation process.

 

This video helps you choose compatible resources and choose a valid license for your work. 

Online Tools & Resources

 

Online Tools & Resources